1. 20:23 16th Apr 2014

    Notes: 4

    Reblogged from imathers

    dustedmagazine:

    "I Dream of Wires: Hardcore Edition" 2013 official trailer from I Dream Of Wires on Vimeo.

    It makes sense that the version of I Dream of Wires that’s currently available on DVD is the four-hour “Hardcore Edition” (with a shorter cut being saved for…

     
  2. 12:14

    Notes: 141

    Reblogged from nedraggett

    nedraggett:

marathonpacks:

pitchfork:

From YouTube, to Pandora, to Spotify, streaming music is piloting our listening habits in fascinating new ways that both upend old hierarchies and recall innovations of previous eras. Eric Harvey explores how these developments are affecting ideas of taste, access, and ownership today—and what this shift means for fans and artists alike—in our latest Cover Story.

Spent the last few months working on this. Thanks especially to Ryan Dombal for editing it, and Joy Burke, Mike Renaud, and Mark Beasley for creating the ridiculous layout. If nothing else, you have to give me credit for interviewing David Bazan and dj/rupture in the same article.

What a week for Pitchfork longform pieces!  First Chris Molanphy’s stellar piece on the Billboard Hip Hop/R&B Charts, now this.

    nedraggett:

    marathonpacks:

    pitchfork:

    From YouTube, to Pandora, to Spotify, streaming music is piloting our listening habits in fascinating new ways that both upend old hierarchies and recall innovations of previous eras. Eric Harvey explores how these developments are affecting ideas of taste, access, and ownership today—and what this shift means for fans and artists alike—in our latest Cover Story.

    Spent the last few months working on this. Thanks especially to Ryan Dombal for editing it, and Joy Burke, Mike Renaud, and Mark Beasley for creating the ridiculous layout. If nothing else, you have to give me credit for interviewing David Bazan and dj/rupture in the same article.

    What a week for Pitchfork longform pieces!  First Chris Molanphy’s stellar piece on the Billboard Hip Hop/R&B Charts, now this.

     
  3. 09:20

    Notes: 13154

    Reblogged from piratemoggy

    Anne Hathaway

    shitmystudentswrite:

    At the age of eighteen, Shakespeare married Anne Hathaway who I thought was the catwoman woman but I googled it and they were different people. But Shakespeare was still happy with her.

     
  4. 00:20

    Notes: 271199

    Reblogged from unrational

     
  5. 19:07 15th Apr 2014

    Notes: 14

    Reblogged from nickminichino

    (Source: lowinterest)

     
  6. 13:53 14th Apr 2014

    Notes: 30

    Reblogged from nedraggett

    nedraggett:

    Chris Molanphy with a major, monster of a piece.  To quote his description of it from FB:

    "Papa’s Got a Brand-New Bag." "Rescue Me." "Mr. Big Stuff." "I’m Every Woman." "Sexual Healing." "I Feel for You." "I Need Love." "Me, Myself & I." "All Around the World." "Real Love." "On & On." "Work It." "What You Know." "A Milli." Classic songs—and all of them only went to No. 1 on Billboard’s Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs chart—a list that was once truly distinct from the Hot 100 pop chart and was the authoritative ranking of the music of black America.

    This piece—on the long, tangled history of that chart—is my first major feature for Pitchfork since last fall’s Modern Rock/Alternative megafeature and, incidentally, is the longest article I’ve ever written. I needed the space to explain how the chart developed, how this chart was saved from irrelevance in 1965 and became the authority in black music for decades, and how the era of digital music has made it a challenge to track what true fans of R&B and hip-hop are consuming, week in, week out.

    The piece is also—a year and a half after Billboard changed the way the chart is formulated—a polemic, from a diehard chart fan who feels the R&B/Hip-Hop chart needs to be fixed. A purported R&B/Hip-Hop chart topped by white people 44 out 52 weeks last year has issues—and even now, when topped by Pharrell, the chart is nothing more than the Hot 100’s truncated stepchild.

    Thank you to everyone who supported me the last six months while I researched and labored over this—I’m relieved to have it out, finally. And to my friends who work for Billboard, consider this (seriously) tough love.

    Near-definitive.

     
  7. 12:25

    Notes: 44507

    Reblogged from likeapairofbottlerockets

    image: Download

    (Source: caramelzappa)

     
  8. 09:20

    Notes: 27

    Asiide from those few guys reveling in their spray-tanned fantasy “brogrammer” masculinity, very few people in programming identify with the term “brogrammer”. The brogrammer is always someone else— he is THOSE Facebook guys who yell too loudly at parties and wave bottles in the air, he is not the nice, shy guy who gets paid 30% more because of his race, gender and appeal to the boy-genius fetishes of VCs. The loud and tacky “brogrammer” is a false flag— if you are not a brogrammer, the logic goes, you must be an outcast genius who has suffered long and would never oppress a fly. The industry is full not of the former but the latter— programmers who are smart and may present as harmlessly “nerdy” but whose sense of themselves as being “the underdog” means that it is very hard to see the ways in which they participate in unconsciously but potentially harmful ways in an industry that has coded them as kings. In reality, programmers in Silicon Valley can be fully and invisibly privileged without ever touching a Grey Goose bottle-service setup or a tube of hair gel.

    Meanwhile, the mainstream media’s rapid adoption and celebration of the imaginary “brogrammer”— imagining him as the updated version of a Wall Street man, rich, callous, and central to a new American story of wealth— means that this fantasy character is being rapidly heroized and glorified across popular culture. This means that shows like Silicon Valley that claim to “critique” the “brogrammer” only end up re-centering the self-centered young male as American hero, failing to see or critique the deep, coded subtleties by which power in the Valley really works.

     
  9. 09:02

    Notes: 64

    Reblogged from desnoise

    This story has been updated to change the genre of the Red Hot Chili Peppers. They are not indie. Bands that perform at the Super Bowl and have large record deals cannot hold that title. We regret the error.
     
  10. 09:00

    Notes: 46

    Reblogged from markrichardson

    Five Drafts Of Pop History

    markrichardson:

    tomewing:

    1. THE NOW: This is the moment and this is what matters.

    2. THE PROPHECY: The moment has just now passed. This is our wager on what remains important.

    3. THE FULFILLMENT: We remember the moment, but it passed some time ago. What matters in it are the seeds of the new moment we now live in.

    4. THE STORY: The moment is a story passed down to us. We retell it in our own words.

    5. THE ARCHAEOLOGY: The moment is lost. By scraping away the story we can recover it.