1. 18:04 16th Sep 2014

    Notes: 713

    Reblogged from falsebinary

    seafarers:

    Volcanic Glow by Tom Kualii

     
  2. 16:44

    Notes: 71471

    Reblogged from dynamofire

    boys-and-suicide:

weird-amphibious-dolphin:

kiei:

Super Mario vs Pacman by Unknown

This was a ride from beginning to end

This was so entertaining to watch

    boys-and-suicide:

    weird-amphibious-dolphin:

    kiei:

    Super Mario vs Pacman by Unknown

    This was a ride from beginning to end

    This was so entertaining to watch

     
  3. 16:40

    Notes: 587

    Reblogged from architectureofdoom

    image: Download

    architectureofdoom:

amaki09:

Curious Places: Bolwoningen (’s-Hertogenbosch/ Netherlands)

View this on the map
     
  4. 12:10

    Notes: 14

    Technology moves fast, but its speed now slows us down. A torpor has descended, the weariness of having lived this change before—or one similar enough, anyway—and all too recently. The future isn’t even here yet, and it’s already exhausted us in advance.

    It’s a far cry from “future shock,” Alvin Toffler’s 1970 term for the post-industrial sensation that too much change happens in too short a time. Where once the loss of familiar institutions and practices produced a shock, now it produces something more tepid and routine. The planned obsolescence that coaxes us to replace our iPhone 5 with an iPhone 6 is no longer disquieting, but just expected. I have to have one has become Of course I’ll get one. The idea that we might willingly reinvent social practice around wristwatch computers less than a decade after reforming it for smartphones is no longer surprising, but predictable. We’ve heard this story before; we know how it ends.

    Future shock is over. Apple Watch reveals that we suffer a new affliction: future ennui. The excitement of a novel technology (or anything, really) has been replaced—or at least dampened—by the anguish of knowing its future burden. This listlessness might yet prove even worse than blind boosterism or cynical naysaying. Where the trauma of future shock could at least light a fire under its sufferers, future ennui exudes the viscous languor of indifferent acceptance. It doesn’t really matter that the Apple Watch doesn’t seem necessary, no more than the iPhone once didn’t too. Increasingly, change is not revolutionary, to use a word Apple has made banal, but presaged.

     
  5. 12:01

    Notes: 53

    Reblogged from barrybailbondsman

    barrybailbondsman:

    crystalleww:

    swoonstep:

    EPISODE 10 - yr hosts (again)

    Here’s the tenth episode of Swoonstep, a podcast where brilliant, cute, hilarious women talk music and crushes. This week on Swoonstep, your babely hosts are back solo to talk about a topic near and dear to their hearts: women in music and pop culture criticism. We also discuss our favorite music in 2014 so far. Plus, we cover a couple of weird crushes that just…haven’t come up in an episode of Swoonstep so far, including Crystal’s love of cheeseball Pitbull, Megan’s love of sad boy Burial, and our dislike of indie rockers (sorry boys).

    We say this every week, but if you’re a woman (or non-cis dude) who wants to talk about music and talk about musician crushes, please reach out. Swoonstep aims to be a space where women are allowed to rant and rave and swoon with abandon because, for real, women are really the best. Women are thoughtful and deliberate and kind, biting and hilarious and brilliant. That’s important to us, so come hang out with us and let us hear your thoughts. Thanks for listening!

    Just the two of us this week, but more guests coming soon.

    Further reading:

    Sasha Geffen’s “Radical Strain”
    Lindsay Zoladz on Matangi and Born to Die
    Julianne Escobedo Shepherd’s “I Came Dressed to Kill: Tracking the Nicki Minaj Makeunder”
    Molly Lambert & Emily Yoshida @ Grantland
    Pitch, Bitch!

    A huge thanks to all our amazing guests and to everyone who listens. 

    Without any conciliatory qualification: women do not write and talk enough about music. There aren’t enough spaces for our thoughts and there isn’t enough respect for our (multitude of) perspectives. I want to offer my support and encouragement to women who are interested in music. I want to read your writing and I want to talk to you about it. This is mostly directed at women who are publishing on Tumblr or Medium or Twitter (or their iPhone notes or their diary or the voice in their head) and might benefit from a space that is explicitly encouraging. Swoonstep is a place where you can be silly and serious at the same time. You can like whatever you like and Crystal and I will gush along with you. Never feel like you can’t be on this podcast. If you identify as a woman, we really, really want you here. Keep writing, keep pitching. One day I will get that VC money and you’re all getting a column. 

     
  6. 11:13

    Notes: 503

    Reblogged from theredshoes

    capricedubibliophile:

    Art Nouveau bookbinding

    1 HARAUCOURT (Edmond) L’EFFORT. La Madone. L’Antéchrist. L’Immortalité. La Fin du monde. Binding by Meunier
    2 SCHWABE (Carlos). - BAUDELAIRE (Charles) LES FLEURS DU MAL. Binding by Meunier
    3 SCHWOB (Marcel) LA PORTE DES REVES. Binding by Meunier
    4 UZANNE (Octave) DICTIONNAIRE BIBLIOPHILOSOPHIQUE. Binding by Weckesser

    Source : Le Blog du Bibliophile

     
  7. 10:57

    Notes: 7

    Reblogged from historicalbookimages

    historicalbookimages:

page 10 of “Art magic, or, Mudane, sub-mundane and super-mundane spiritism [microform] a treatise in three parts and twenty-three sections, descriptive of art magic, spiritism, the different orders of spirits in the universe known to be r elated

    historicalbookimages:

    page 10 of “Art magic, or, Mudane, sub-mundane and super-mundane spiritism [microform] a treatise in three parts and twenty-three sections, descriptive of art magic, spiritism, the different orders of spirits in the universe known to be r elated

     
  8. 10:49

    Notes: 249

    Reblogged from beatonna

    image: Download

    beatonna:

Broadside Ballads from the Bodleian libraries hosts a great collection.  I am especially impressed by the fantastic illustration archive, divided into neat and specific categories.  Go look!

    beatonna:

    Broadside Ballads from the Bodleian libraries hosts a great collection.  I am especially impressed by the fantastic illustration archive, divided into neat and specific categories.  Go look!

     
  9. 09:20

    Notes: 43

    Reblogged from markrichardson

    markrichardson:

    From an entry called “Six Outrageous Plans That Didn’t Happen”

    In his book The Shadow Presidents, author Michael Medved relates the extreme disappointment of H.R. Haldeman over his failure to implement his plan to link up all the homes in America by coaxial cable. In Haldeman’s words, ‘There would be two-way communication. Through computer, you could use your television set to order up whatever you wanted. The morning paper, entertainment services, shopping services, coverage of sporting events and public events…. Just as Eisenhower linked up the nation’s cities by highways so that you could get there, the Nixon legacy would have linked them by cable communications so that you wouldn’t have to go there.’ One can almost see the dreamy eyes of Nixon and Haldeman as they sat around discussing a plan that would eliminate the need for newspapers, seemingly oblivious to its Big Brother aspects. Fortunately, the Watergate scandal intervened, and Nixon was forced to resign before ‘The Wired Nation’ could be hooked up.

    I posted this once, but I feel I have to explain it. There was a popular series of cheap paperback books in the ’70s and ’80s called The Book of Lists. They had lists of things, trivia, etc. It was the internet before the internet. And in one of the first editions of this book, from 1980, there was this entry, part of a series called “Six Outrageous Plans That Didn’t Happen”. And in this list were some grandiose or terrifying plans by people in power that, thankfully, did not come to fruition.

    Remember this is 1980. 

    And one of the plans listed in this bit of trivia is a plan by Richard Nixon to “link up all the homes in America by coaxial cable.” News, shopping—all if it was to come into the homes of America via computer. And Nixon had this idea in 1973 (or earlier). And the perspective of this book written in 1980, is “Thank god this didn’t happen because the government would be spying on you.”

     
  10. 21:35 15th Sep 2014

    Notes: 1197

    Reblogged from minimoonstar

    minimoonstar:

    archiemcphee:

    In 1888 actress Ellen Terry performed the role of Lady Macbeth at London’s Lyceum Theatre while wearing an awesome green gown bedecked with the 1,000 sloughed-off wings of the jewel beetle. It quickly became one of the most celebrated costumes of the Victorian era, immortalized in a portrait painted by John Singer Sargent.

    126 years is a long time and over the years Dame Terry’s dress experienced all sorts of wear and tear and numerous alterations. But after 1,300 hours of painstaking work over and £50,000 ($81,000) in expenses, this magnificent costume has been restored to its original glory.

    Work began on the gown two years ago after a successful fundraising campaign, but restoring the beetle wings wasn’t the most difficult task. “We had collected the beetle wings that had fallen off over the years,” says Paul Meredith, house manager at Smallhythe Place, where the dress now resides, “so that the conservator was able to reattach many of the originals, plus others that had been donated to us—1,000 in total.” The restoration team patched the 100 or so broken wings using small pieces of Japanese tissue and wheat starch paste.

    Click here to read more about the restoration process.

    Photos by Zenzie Tinker

    [via Morbid Anatomy and Ecouterre]

    Holy crap, I had no idea this dress still existed!