1. 16:40 28th Jul 2014

    Notes: 13

    Reblogged from flourish

    flourish:

    I spent a lot of time at this San Diego Comic Con (con report tomorrow, by the way!) talking with people about privacy and social codes and expectations. 

    Of course, I then discover than Anil Dash has said all the things I was thinking much more clearly and concisely than I would have.

    Go read it!

     
  2. 12:41

    Notes: 26

    Reblogged from abbyjean

    I think it’s largely the changing nature of consumers. Hardcover books are often expensive, regardless of length. As a consumer, I almost instinctively buy paper books that are meatier, because I feel like I’m getting my money’s worth. It’s also never been easier to lug around huge books with us at all times in our digital devices, so why not make ‘em longer. A publisher a hundred years ago might have scoffed at the cost of printing a long book, but now with e-books, the cost of publishing a 1,000-page book vs. a 150-page book is virtually the same (obviously it’s still different with print versions…). Our lifestyle may also play a part. This is completely just conjecture, so bear with me. We, as a people, are far more sedentary than we were a hundred years ago. Does our tendency to sit on the couch for more and more hours a day play a part in how we consume media? Absolutely. Look at the phenomenon of Netflix binge watching. Could the same effect take place with books? We are into bingeing our media, and the bigger the binge the better, so we eat our hearts out with giant books that can completely remove us from reality and how sedentary we really are. If books were shorter, our escapes from reality wouldn’t last so long.

    Totally unsupported conjecture: a lot of authors tend to write long, and the editors who might otherwise rein them in and tighten their copy are increasingly overworked and/or nonexistent. 

     
  3. 12:27

    Notes: 22

    Reblogged from hazelcills

    hazelcills:

    I like when fashion copy liberally uses the word “game.” It’s so funny. Her shoe game is real. Her accessories game is on point. BB Cream is a game-changer. I guess this feels even more pertinent b/c of how everyone in my life is playing the Kim Kardashian game, which I believe is based off of gathering various hairstyles and expensive clothing so you move up in social status. But I’ve definitely used “game” in a style sense many, many times in various snappy fashion writing jobs I’ve had and never fully realized its weirdo implications. STYLE IS A GAME AND WE’RE ALL PLAYING/LOSING. :) :) :)

    further reading: “The Vogue mentality is a crushing, totalitarian, all-encompassing binary of right and wrong, and good bad, and no one can ever really obtain it.”

     
  4. 11:00

    Notes: 18

    You wake up to a jazzy MIDI version of the “Happy Birthday” song. Your smart thermostat and smoke detector are singing in harmony because today is your day. Your fitness tracker is vibrating in an unfamiliar Morse Code. Searching the internet, you come across a question in the support forums about it, explaining it is the preprogrammed birthday greeting silent alarm that you can disable after pairing the device again and updating your settings. Your bathroom scale, toilet, and garage door also welcome you with birthday wishes. Open up the refrigerator to another friendly jingle. Tropicana, Fage, and Sabra Hummus all wish you happy birthday. Now there’s an incoming message. It is the “birthday selfie” it snapped when you reached for the orange juice.

    Your automobile navigation system is the next device with a special greeting. “Hello. Good morNING. And. Happy birthDAY,” the system says in its usual condescending inflection. Driving to work, your connected ring unexpectedly starts blinking and vibrating without a break. Startled, you slide it off and throw it in your purse. It is set to alert you to incoming Facebook messages. And today, on your birthday, there are hundreds.

    “And happy birthday [your name pronounced as a variation of the misspelling on the cup],” the Starbucks barista says. The cloud-based Clover coffeemaker read your rewards card data as soon as you walked into the shop. You can still hear the ring faintly buzzing in your purse until —oops!—your smart watch pings all of your contacts with a hologram of candles on a cake. The flood of incoming emails and texts short-circuits your connected ring. Silence at last.

     
  5. 11:40 27th Jul 2014

    Notes: 3

    Plays: 60

    Spent last night in a Russian pop music K-hole; this was my favorite. The title, I think (as in, I am using a translation tool and it could be completely wrong) translates to “Sad Music,” which is apt enough; but “fractured” might be closer to how it sounds.

     
  6. 13:32 26th Jul 2014

    Notes: 167

    Reblogged from text-mode

    text-mode:

    By Aaron Marcus using Fortran on a PDP-10, 1972-1974.

    source

     
  7. 13:31

    Notes: 155

    Reblogged from crumbler

    image: Download

    crumbler:

thisistheverge:

Mouth Silence is the sound of your brain roasting It’s the most horrific mix of the ’80s, ’90s, and today. Imagine the rapture in all its violence and beauty, set to the sound of a trillion angels harmonizing to Third Eye Blind’s “Semi-charmed Life.” Imagine yourself hurdling through a lukewarm, glowing, pearlescent wormhole singing, “I’m not listening when you say goodbye.” It’s glorious. And that’s just the intro.

If you make it through the first couple minutes, this is weirdly compelling stuff. 

    crumbler:

    thisistheverge:

    Mouth Silence is the sound of your brain roasting
    It’s the most horrific mix of the ’80s, ’90s, and today. Imagine the rapture in all its violence and beauty, set to the sound of a trillion angels harmonizing to Third Eye Blind’s “Semi-charmed Life.” Imagine yourself hurdling through a lukewarm, glowing, pearlescent wormhole singing, “I’m not listening when you say goodbye.” It’s glorious. And that’s just the intro.

    If you make it through the first couple minutes, this is weirdly compelling stuff. 

     
  8. 15:19 25th Jul 2014

    Notes: 27

    Reblogged from teenageart

    tomewing:

    notquiteaspopular:

    Cher - “Believe” (#806, 1998, 7 weeks). Under discussion here: http://freakytrigger.co.uk/popular/2014/07/cher-believe/

    I wrote this VERY fast to get it in before I go on holiday tomorrow, but I think it’s pretty good. I think the song’s pretty good too.

     
  9. 14:29

    Notes: 32

    For Willis, if your revolutionary thinking didn’t accurately reflect reality, it couldn’t change reality. In her version of liberation, sexual revolutionaries aren’t smug, performative hedonists who play out their fantasies in villas on Mustique; they wonder instead how thin the line is between courage and delusion while drinking coffee alone in their apartments or sitting on benches outside the Laundromat. And rock writers don’t turn their prose up to 11 to compete with the bands they’re covering, or get so bound up in the role of gnomic wizard that they can’t just shrug their shoulders and say, as Willis did, well, I was wrong about the Ramones; they admit to communing with what she called “the screaming teenager” inside. To Willis, acknowledging the real meant acknowledging that we are minds connected to bodies, and that what may not seem real at all — the unconscious and the psyche — are very powerful forces. Nearly every piece is a reminder that the culture we live in, even when we don’t profess its prevailing beliefs, has an effect on the psyche; that we internalize expectations even when we think we’re free; that we need to gather in groups to change our minds and the minds of others, because otherwise we stand alone in our pain and confusion, thinking that we’re the problem.
     
  10. 13:00

    Notes: 23

    Reblogged from abbyjean

    abbyjean:

3d printed medieval armor for Barbie. (via Faire Play | Zheng3)

    abbyjean:

    3d printed medieval armor for Barbie. (via Faire Play | Zheng3)