1. image: Download

    nyrbclassics:

200 years ago today, Shelley and his entourage find their Lake Lucerne digs not up to snuff and “flit” without paying the bill:

On Friday, 26 August [1814], a mere three days after their arrival on the lake, they suddenly decided that they had had enough. Arguing through the afternoon, as the rain fell miserably on the waters below them, they decided first to go over the St Gothard, and finally, quite abruptly, to return to England and London. They could manage it, Shelley calculated, if they took the risk of travelling by the ‘water-diligence’ used mostly by local peasants, merchants and students, down the length of the Rhine to a Channel port. The next morning, the 27th, they flitted from Brunnen at dawn on the first boat available, having packed their bags and omitted to inform or pay their landlord, and gazed back on the receding shore ironically imagining ‘the astonishment of the good people of Brunnen’. ‘Most laughable to think’, as Jane put it, ‘of our going to England the second day after we entered a new house for six months — All because the stove don’t suit.’
—Richard Holmes, Shelley: The Pursuit

Our devoted blog follower, whose blog is The Red Shoes, sent in this cosy photo with a pun that we will spare you (unless you really want to know)*
Have you a photo of an NYRB Classic posed with a cup of coffee or tea? By all means send it to this address and we’ll add it to the Classics and Coffee Club series. And let us know where you bought or borrowed the book from—we’d be glad to shout out places that stock NYRB Classics.
*She asks: “Does Shelley suffer a tea change?”

Improbably, this is someone who references Claire Clairmont and The Red Shoes in one postwho is not me.

    nyrbclassics:

    200 years ago today, Shelley and his entourage find their Lake Lucerne digs not up to snuff and “flit” without paying the bill:

    On Friday, 26 August [1814], a mere three days after their arrival on the lake, they suddenly decided that they had had enough. Arguing through the afternoon, as the rain fell miserably on the waters below them, they decided first to go over the St Gothard, and finally, quite abruptly, to return to England and London. They could manage it, Shelley calculated, if they took the risk of travelling by the ‘water-diligence’ used mostly by local peasants, merchants and students, down the length of the Rhine to a Channel port. The next morning, the 27th, they flitted from Brunnen at dawn on the first boat available, having packed their bags and omitted to inform or pay their landlord, and gazed back on the receding shore ironically imagining ‘the astonishment of the good people of Brunnen’. ‘Most laughable to think’, as Jane put it, ‘of our going to England the second day after we entered a new house for six months — All because the stove don’t suit.’

    —Richard Holmes, Shelley: The Pursuit

    Our devoted blog follower, whose blog is The Red Shoes, sent in this cosy photo with a pun that we will spare you (unless you really want to know)*

    Have you a photo of an NYRB Classic posed with a cup of coffee or tea? By all means send it to this address and we’ll add it to the Classics and Coffee Club series. And let us know where you bought or borrowed the book from—we’d be glad to shout out places that stock NYRB Classics.

    *She asks: “Does Shelley suffer a tea change?”

    Improbably, this is someone who references Claire Clairmont and The Red Shoes in one postwho is not me.

     
  2. 13:05

    Notes: 156

    Reblogged from text-mode

    text-mode:

    Cross sea at Île de Ré, France. The waves of two weather systems meet and create a dangerous grid.

    via

     
  3. 07:34

    Notes: 58

    Reblogged from bestofmidi

    Plays: 642

    bestofmidi:

    Janet_Jackson_on_Sonic_the_Hedgehog_in_Bridge_Zone.mid

    Yuzo Koshiro - Bridge Zone (Janet Jackson Remix)

    ?????????????????????????????????

    This is from a list of MIDIs arranged by Matthew Seldon submitted by gamecubesally!!!

    MIDI

     
  4. 20:29 25th Aug 2014

    Notes: 5

    a band is a body and there’re bodies and bands that never get to their futures, so we felt lucky. but we were beginning to suspect that the tour we were presently on would be our last. a death doesn’t often announce itself loudly, especially not the death of a band. but after a series of small moments—symptoms of impending doom—we began to feel a weightless wispiness, a wispy weightlessness, that made us feel sad and stupid. future ghosts.

    “suck is money!” we’d announced gleefully to each other over the years and then laugh. the people in our business who shamelessly clawed their way to piles of cash seemed so transparent and pitiable; just ridiculous. staring at this traffic jam though, it seemed much less funny. cuz money is only goofy when you have enough of it and we’d run out. the shit around us was breaking and we were broke. even our woolly mammoth of a bus was old and wheezing, on her last legs and the last of her kind, like us.

    of course, “how many eggs did you put in that basket? and whose fault is that?”

    everybody’s gotta be ready to let go of everything, right? everything we have, have done, are. no strings attached. that’s peace, i imagine. but we weren’t peaceful that day, weren’t ready to die. our asses parked on a metal guardrail, squinting into the heartbreakingly beautiful oregon air, at a destination that didn’t seem to be there…we weren’t yet prepared to go gentle. seemed like there were still so many songs left to play.

    - Kristin Hersh, Purgatory/Paradise, book

     
  5. 17:31

    Notes: 16

    Reblogged from blockygraphics

    blockygraphics:

An early illustration of clickbait? (AN00802_.WMF, created August 11, 1997; clip art included with Microsoft Works 4.5.)

    blockygraphics:

    An early illustration of clickbait? (AN00802_.WMF, created August 11, 1997; clip art included with Microsoft Works 4.5.)

     
  6. 16:01

    Notes: 13

    me, at the jukebox, on two pop singles I like

    (Click through, too — both posts feature a lot of excellent writing, by quality and in Taylor’s case by quantity too.)

    Charli XCX, “Break the Rules

    Taylor Swift announced her love for late-’80s pop just as Charli XCX thoroughly abandoned her immaculate recollection of the form that was True Romance. What she’s abandoned it for, thank goodness, at least in part isn’t bland “Boom Clap” metapop but pop-rock made by badass robots with teased hair-filaments: the stuff of Sky Ferreira’s “Red Lips” and Fefe Dobson’s debut and Garbage at their commercial tackiest on to Republica — and as the one person alive who listened to Christiana Obey, I’m all for that. Charli throws in references at post-Internet hyperspeed: building off that one guitar line everyone uses to signify punk in pop, rhyming “discotheque” with “getting wrecked” because anachronisms are also broken rules. The song builds like EDM, but instead of a drop there’s a low-key variation on the “Shout” riff, and is that a DJ Mustard loop I hear in the background where it’s pointless? Even Charli’s trash is treasure.  [8]

    Taylor Swift, “Shake It Off

    I feel like I’ve pissed off the world’s most insular wizard, who has doomed me to be the contrarian on every Taylor Swift song. Single after single of supposed singular girlfire left me grumpy and unmoved, and now her new one is a tiny, sour-sweet raspberry hard candy piece and it’s great. A backlash was due — Red‘s singles cycle petered out, Swift’s image took some tabloid hits. In times of adversity businesses batten the hatches, which in pop means Max Martin and Shellback on everything and less personality, and the grumbling associated with that. Then came the video: so close to being OK, then enter that scene, like twerking clockwork. At first I thought the team was just going for a lazy Evolution of Dance, Except I’m Taylor Swift And I’m Totes Awk! theme, and all they took away from Miley2K3 was that people called her slutty — but no, it’s Mark fucking Romanek, who directed “Scream,” “Closer,” “Criminal,” and “99 Problems.” He knows how controversy works; more pertinently, he hasn’t done any videos this decade except “Picasso Baby,” U2 and this, so this clip is probably just a deliberately cynical way to funnel your clicks into his kid’s tuition jar. The song, however, is great, mostly because it stands alone. Taylor isn’t rapping, she’s doing cheer chants or perhaps Leighton Meester; every spoken-word interlude in music is not rap. The rest is concerned solely with caramelizing RobynMileyChristina, “Problem,” “Happy,” Bella Thorne and the tabloid bullshit (“I go on too many dates, but I can’t make them stay”) into limitless hook sugar. It is inessential and indelible. Like “Get Lucky” and “Call Me Maybe,” it’s got an endlessly snowclonable chorus; meme aggregators gonna gate-gate-gate-gate-gate. It is also a massive earworm. [7]

     
  7. 15:41

    Notes: 3

    Facebook’s announcement today is great news for Upworthy. The site has been pushing “attention minutes” as the next internet metric all year:

    "We love thinking this way because it rewards us for sharing content that people really enjoy and find valuable — not just stuff they click on a lot. It may mean that we don’t do quite as well on uniques or pageviews, but that’s a trade-off we’re happy to make because this is a metric focused on real audience satisfaction."

    Upworthy isn’t the only company interested in this idea, nor is it the only type of company: Analytics company Chartbeat has been leading the charge on the time metric as a more honest alternative to page views and unique visitors, and Medium has used it to determine how much to pay certain contributors.

    It doesn’t take much imagination to think of ways to game “attention minutes”—if you’ve ever seen a headline over a YouTube embed with an appeal to stick around until a certain point in a video, or a post that implores you to stick around for a particular list item (These 29 Advertisements Are Almost Too Clever For Their Own Good. #11 Got Me Good. LOL.), then you’ve already seen some of these strategies in action. You know what else takes a long time? Quizzes. Games. The possibilities are terrifying and endless!

    — The Awl
     
  8. 15:33

    Notes: 14

    [Grande] came to Broadway as a teenager, and began seriously writing songs at around the same time using a Boss RC 50 looping machine, trying to emulate her hero, Imogen Heap.
    — Never in recent memory have I wanted something to leak as much as this. (Via NYT.)
     
  9. 22:11 24th Aug 2014

    Notes: 92707

    Reblogged from dynamofire

    image: Download

    dad-rock-davos:

transhumanisticpanspermia:

rachellebutler:

Treble clefs by (L to R) Bach, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Mendelssohn, Schumann, Brahms, Debussy, and Ravel.
Source

all musicians across all time periods: “fuck how does that thing go”

Beethoven didn’t even try

    dad-rock-davos:

    transhumanisticpanspermia:

    rachellebutler:

    Treble clefs by (L to R) Bach, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Mendelssohn, Schumann, Brahms, Debussy, and Ravel.

    Source

    all musicians across all time periods: “fuck how does that thing go”

    Beethoven didn’t even try

     
  10. 16:22

    Notes: 13

    Reblogged from thekristinhersharchives

    thekristinhersharchives:

    Throwing Muses. Shinro Ohtake drawings of Kingsway Studio in New Orleans, done while visiting the band when they were finishing University (4AD/Sire), September 1994.

    Taken from the cardboard booklet of the limited 4AD edition of University.