1. 14:27 17th Oct 2014

    Notes: 107

    Reblogged from fuckyeahcartography

    image: Download

    globemakers:

This is the kind of shop window we like to stumble upon …. http://instagram.com/p/tzfNZOBOg7/?modal=true
Bellerby & Co Globemakers, London.

    globemakers:

    This is the kind of shop window we like to stumble upon …. http://instagram.com/p/tzfNZOBOg7/?modal=true

    Bellerby & Co Globemakers, London.

     
  2. 14:27

    Notes: 5

    Reblogged from historicalbookimages

    Tags: typesetting

    historicalbookimages:

page 735 of “The Encyclopedia britannica; a dictionary of arts, sciences, and general literature. With new maps, and original American articles by eminent writers. With American revisions and additions, bringing each volume up to date” (1892)

    historicalbookimages:

    page 735 of “The Encyclopedia britannica; a dictionary of arts, sciences, and general literature. With new maps, and original American articles by eminent writers. With American revisions and additions, bringing each volume up to date” (1892)

     
  3. 13:45

    Notes: 26

    Reblogged from bmichael

    image: Download

    bmichael:


firstdraftsofhistory:

Article: Heavy metal music
Revision: 30 September 2001

This is a pretty cool project. The first versions of various Wikipedia pages.

    bmichael:

    firstdraftsofhistory:

    Article: Heavy metal music

    Revision: 30 September 2001

    This is a pretty cool project. The first versions of various Wikipedia pages.

     
  4. 10:24

    Notes: 1320

    Reblogged from fotzepolitic

    image: Download

    soulbots:

The Wunderkammer Olbricht, curated by Georg Laue, Me Collectors Room, Berlin, 2010. Via Morbid Anatomy
Maintaining cabinets of curiosities evolved during Renaissance and Baroque. In these collectors’ rooms precious artworks (artificialia), rare phenomena of nature (naturalia), scientific instruments (scientifica), objects from strange worlds (exotica), and inexplicable items (mirabilia) were preserved. They reflected the standard of knowledge and view of the world at that time.

    soulbots:

    The Wunderkammer Olbricht, curated by Georg Laue, Me Collectors Room, Berlin, 2010. Via Morbid Anatomy

    Maintaining cabinets of curiosities evolved during Renaissance and Baroque. In these collectors’ rooms precious artworks (artificialia), rare phenomena of nature (naturalia), scientific instruments (scientifica), objects from strange worlds (exotica), and inexplicable items (mirabilia) were preserved. They reflected the standard of knowledge and view of the world at that time.

     
  5. 09:36

    Notes: 20328

    Reblogged from flavorpill

    image: Download

    shinoillustration:

雨宿り

    shinoillustration:

    雨宿り

     
  6. 08:48

    Notes: 145

    Reblogged from architectureofdoom

    image: Download

    nature-in-quotes:

These floating doors in Oak Tree House are visited more by birds than humans

    nature-in-quotes:

    These floating doors in Oak Tree House are visited more by birds than humans

     
  7. Tried to be fair about it, still didn’t much like it.

     
  8. 10:24

    Notes: 24

    Reblogged from aintgotnoladytronblues

    In the modern era — in which every civilian carries a video camera in his pocket and has instant access to a 24/7 global publishing platform — the idea of cover-ups no longer makes any sense. There are secrets, sure — witness the NSA — but, if anything, we’re awash in way too much evidence. If the Kennedy assassination happened today, we wouldn’t be rewatching every frame of the Zapruder film; we’d be sifting through 10,000 camera-phone videos taken from every angle and algorithmically sorting through tweets, sent live, in real time, from the scene. Think of the days following the Boston Marathon: The problem wasn’t too little proof, but too much, and a million nameless Redditors (and the New York Post) cluelessly Wiki-sorting through the endless amounts of evidentiary data. 9/11 was likely the most documented mass-tragedy in history. Thus we have the post-9/11 version of the conspiracy nut: the so-called “truther,” to whom every bit of the copious evidence must be questioned, repudiated, and disproved. As time marches on and new technology allows us to, say, see the American flags left by astronauts on the moon, the moon-landing hoax morphs from a cover-up (they’re hiding the evidence!) to a truther-style conspiracy (they’re faking the evidence!). For a truther, the goal is no longer to find the smoking gun, but to figure out which of a dozen readily available smoking guns is the one that fired the killing shot.


    This is why Wolf’s rantings felt so alarming, yet so familiar: It’s a conspiracy theory precisely tailored to the modern surveillance age. Sure, there’s actual video footage of the atrocity being committed, but guess what? The footage is fake. And the news reports detailing the crimes? Bogus — the reporters are in on it, too. And all those real people, filmed from a dozen angles, who were clearly left emotionally ravaged? Actors, every single one of them. (Drawn, apparently, from some inexhaustible pool of expert and unrecognizable thespians who can convincingly play grieving relatives and be trusted somehow not to post about it minutes later on Facebook.) The essential job of the modern conspiracy nut — the truther — is not to uncover evidence, but to explain exactly why the overabundance of evidence is untrustworthy and wrong.


    Which makes Gone Girl the ultimate truther fable. […] Nick is not the victim of a cover-up, but by the end, he’s definitely an Amy truther. As are we, the audience. Nick’s tale confirms what Wolf and her truther ilk suspect. All the proof is untrustworthy. All the footage is faked. All the victims are actors. And the defining, vaguely nihilistic belief of the modern conspiracy theorist is no longer that the truth is out there. It’s that nothing out there is the truth.

    — “Gone Girl is The Ultimate Truther Movie”, Adam Sternbergh, Vulture, 2014. (via aintgotnoladytronblues)
     
  9. 09:36

    Notes: 42

    Reblogged from millionsmillions

    image: Download

    millionsmillions:

We’ve published a fair number of pieces about the import of book covers. You may have read one of our US-UK book cover battles. Over at The Awl, Amanda Pickering takes a look at one of the stranger aspects of book design: the animals that appear on the covers of programming books.

    millionsmillions:

    We’ve published a fair number of pieces about the import of book covers. You may have read one of our US-UK book cover battles. Over at The AwlAmanda Pickering takes a look at one of the stranger aspects of book design: the animals that appear on the covers of programming books.

     
  10. aintgotnoladytronblues:

    fritzpape:

    highdio:

    catbountry:

    robotlyra:

    stevenwallaby:

    claudefelixfloor:

    711kid:

    what the fuck

    this is the scariest shit i’ve ever seen in my life

    This is so cool. Eat Otomo Yoshihide’s heart out.

    I’m used to associating this sort of heavy creepy distortion type audio as being achieved by internal studio mixing. Picking sections, warping them, reversing, repeating, all that sort of thing done with the board tools and programming suites. I didn’t stop to think that the same sort of effects could be achieved PHYSICALLY by fucking with the playback tools and the storage mediums themelves. It’s incredibly clever, especially when they introduce the cut-apart and reconstructed vinyl platters, it becomes the audio equivalent of cut-paste collaging or magnetic poetry. It takes something as ethereal and insubstantial as music, and makes it as tangible as sculpture.

    I really wanna start fucking with vinyl live now. Hack the fuck out of old mediums forever~

    remember the days when people made “experimental” music by recording their messing about with just this sort of physical media fuckery in the, what was it, ’70s, right? this fills me with nostalgia for the dreams of old futures.

    Context:

    [Camilla] Sørensen and [Greta] Christensen met at Copenhagen’s Royal Danish Art Academy in 2001 while studying sculpture, and decided to collaborate on a series of soundscapes. After exploring a shared interest in Hammond organs, they decided that there was little interest in learning how to play a traditional instrument. Using vinyl was convenient as it was readily available from Copenhagen’s charity shops, and interesting as a sculptural item. “In a very sculptural sense, the sound is directly connected to the material alongside the recorded material, which has its own time and its own history,” Christensen says. “The record as an object that you can work with very directly and manipulate. We turn it into something new.”
     
    After relocating to Berlin in 2003, the duo began performing and came upon their moniker by accident. “At a flyer for one of the shows,” Sørensen relates, “we saw a description written underneath our names of what we do: vinyl terror. We added the horror just because we were two – so one could be the terror and one could be the horror.” I press them: which member is the terror and which is the horror? They pause and think carefully over their response, before deciding that there is a bit of both in each of them.

    (Source: ipissedinyourmountaindew)